Traditional Recipes

Forest dwellings communities and populations bordering forests relay on the forest as their main food source. They collect herbs and plants, fruits and vegetables, roots and nuts, and hunt for a wide range of game, such as wild boar, dear, small birds and frogs.

Jungle food is quick and simple to prepare and contain only few ingredients. Today we find it on restaurants’ menus and even cook it at home, far away from the jungles.

In this straightforward and rewarding stir-fried dish, I am using boiled salted duck egg, available from Asian markets, as my flavoring assistant. During stir-frying, the egg yolk dissolves to a velvety sauce that softly coats the squids, and complimenting their ocean’s flavor. The alternate reds and greens strips of the vegetables emerged from the buttery yellow sauce are tempting for a taste.

The original version uses three egg yolks – a bit too much for a health conscious person like me. Therefore, I am using only one whole egg, both the egg white and the egg yolk. I tune down the white’s sharp saltiness with an additional portion of sugar, and compensate for the color lost by adding a spoon of commercial chili sauce to improve. The resulting is a well-balanced dish with the right texture that stands up in this healthy version against its original with a winning smile….

When the age-old question “what is for dinner” pops up, I bet that many of us will prefer recipes with just few ingredients found on supermarket shelves, short on preparation and cooking time. A difficult request from an ethnic oriented food website. However, today I will surplus that request and bring you a recipe that beside a spirit of enthusiasm requires virtually no culinary skills to prepare.

A Thai twist on the good ole’ fried eggs. We will take this prehistoric dish another notch! With a simple spicy lime and fish sauce dressing we will jazz it up into an energetic dish that is uniquely remarkable and captures some of the essence of Thai food – the mixing and playfulness in the use of flavors.

Here is a recipe that, according to the legend, shows the efforts of one young man to please his wife’s mother. Using only the very basic ingredients he could find in the pantry, he put together a plate that cannot fail. From the culinary aspect I mean. Because from the grammar point of view we ended up with a dish that is called…. oy vey…. yes, “The son in law’s balls”….

The dish captures the eye with its vivid color – It is beautiful! It is bright! It is happy! – and it fits well within the comfort zone of most westerners. It is not surprising that this dish has made its way to the top of the charts, consistently ranked among the top ten tastiest Thai dishes served abroad.

This salad is quick and easy to make. The dish enjoys carnival of colors and defined flavors that stand in line to tease your palate; Sour, Salty, Hot and a feathery touch of Sweet. They are all ready to play in this less than 10 minutes preparations.

The dressing is made with equal parts of lime juice and fish sauce, pinch of sugar and chilies as much as you dare. Mix just before serving. It goes well with a plate of hot white rice and crispy Thai omelette.

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