basic Thai cooking techniques

basic Thai cooking techniques

Ground Roasted Rice
(ข้าวคั่ว ; khaao khuaa)

Ground roasted rice is often used in Thai Northern Eastern style cooking (Issan) in spicy salads as an aromatic and textural agent. Offering an unmistakably hearty and rustic bite to the food.

You can find it in almost any Asian supermarket and it is very simple to prepare. I do hope that you will overcome the temptation of reaching your hands to the supermarket shelve and prepare your own.

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Swamp eel triple layered red curry with fingerroot, bitter ginger, sand ginger and Thai basil flowers แกงเผ็ดปลาไหลทรงเครื่อง
basic Thai cooking techniques

Basic Red Thai Curry Paste
(น้ำพริกแกงเผ็ด ; nam phrik gaaeng phet)

I know it is easy to reach to the supermarket shelves and grab a pack of Thai curry paste. I hope that you will consider making your own and I think you should. Things often get lost in translation, and even worse if they are commercially pre-packed for five years of use. Thai cooking is based on freshness and if you are serious about Thai cooking, you will be amazed how with just a bit of an effort your food rises into new levels.

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Traditional Recipes

Crispy Basic Thai Omelette
(ไข่เจียว ; khai jiaao)

Blessed are the Thais for their unique attention for details. They do no spare efforts in creating intricate work of arts and their cuisine harmonizes flavors of robust ingredients in ingenious recipes.

However, there will be days that even the Thais would crave for an easy, simple, cheap and tasty meal – a laid back, quick and down-to-earth menu – The Omelette, Usually served over rice, with Chili & Lime Fish Sauce (phrik naam bplaa) or as a side dish for a multi course meal.

Great Thai omelette must have crisp borders and soft center. Endless tips and tricks were born in the search for a foolproof method of making the perfect Thai Omelette. Some will secretly add lime juice or baking powder, a drop of water or even frying the egg whites separately.

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Fermented Thai Pork Sausage Recipe
basic Thai cooking techniques

Making Fermented Thai Pork Sausage (แหนมหมู ; naem moo)

Naem is a fermented sausage made with pork, pork skins, cooked sticky rice (glutinous), fresh garlic, salt, sugar and bird’s eye chilies. The sausage is wrapped in banana leaves or synthetic casings, and fermented for 3-5 days at about 30 degrees (C) and 50% humidity. The fermentation process enables the growth of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts, mostly lactobacilli, which accounts for the sourness of the sausage. The salt acts as an inhibitor – preventing the meat from going rotten, allowing the lactic acid bacteria and yeasts to feed on the rice and sugar, and fermenting the meat to perfection.

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basic Thai cooking techniques

Chili & Lime Fish Sauce (พริกน้ำปลา or น้ำปลาพริก ; phrik naam bplaa)

Mixing finely chopped fresh chilies including their seeds with fish sauce and a splash of lime juice makes the staple sauce accompanying almost every Thai dish. Restaurants reserve it an honor place on the table, next to the tissue paper and the tooth picks. The debate is on. Some call it “phrik naam bplaa” other will insist on “naam bplaa phrik“. Whatever it’s called, every Thai will admit that some foods just do not taste right without it. It is unimaginable having hot and crispy Thai omelette over rice without it. So, make a batch of it. It will keep for a few weeks in the fridge and will bring you closer to Thailand as it does to the millions of Thais abroad every day.

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Coconut Cream (หัวกะทิ; huaa kathi) and Coconut Milk (หางกะทิ; hang kathi)
basic Thai cooking techniques

Making Your Own Coconut Cream and Coconut Milk

A good practice for the enthusiastic Thai food lover is to use freshly squeezed coconut cream when possible. The taste and depth of flavors will overcome any dish created with canned cream. Squeezing your own cream is very simple.

Select a coconut that feels heavy to its size. That is a sign the there more flesh inside and it would yield more cream.

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