Thai food recipes by preparation techniques

This is an aromatic stew that leans into the sweet spectrum of the palate. An all-time Thai favorite, moo palo was introduced locally by the Chinese-Cantonese and Tae Chiew immigrants who flocked to the Kingdom in the early nineteenth century. The name of this dish originates from two Chinese words: pah ziah and lou.

When the age-old question “what is for dinner” pops up, I bet that many of us will prefer recipes with just few ingredients found on supermarket shelves, short on preparation and cooking time. A difficult request from an ethnic oriented food website. However, today I will surplus that request and bring you a recipe that beside a spirit of enthusiasm requires virtually no culinary skills to prepare.

A Thai twist on the good ole’ fried eggs. We will take this prehistoric dish another notch! With a simple spicy lime and fish sauce dressing we will jazz it up into an energetic dish that is uniquely remarkable and captures some of the essence of Thai food – the mixing and playfulness in the use of flavors.

The northeast region of Thailand, bordered with Laos in the north and Cambodia in the east, is a rough land to work. Issan, as it known in Thai, suffers droughts and deficiencies, the land gets really dry and unforgiving making in some area the digging for mineral salt a better business than agriculture.

Issan food is made from bricks of simplicity. It reflects its people coarse life and is in general pungent and hot. Eaten with sticky rice, only very little is required to flavor the rice in the hands of the entire family. I love the rustic Issan food and I own a sincere admiration to their culinary ingenuity.

Here is a recipe that, according to the legend, shows the efforts of one young man to please his wife’s mother. Using only the very basic ingredients he could find in the pantry, he put together a plate that cannot fail. From the culinary aspect I mean. Because from the grammar point of view we ended up with a dish that is called…. oy vey…. yes, “The son in law’s balls”….

The dish captures the eye with its vivid color – It is beautiful! It is bright! It is happy! – and it fits well within the comfort zone of most westerners. It is not surprising that this dish has made its way to the top of the charts, consistently ranked among the top ten tastiest Thai dishes served abroad.

This salad is quick and easy to make. The dish enjoys carnival of colors and defined flavors that stand in line to tease your palate; Sour, Salty, Hot and a feathery touch of Sweet. They are all ready to play in this less than 10 minutes preparations.

The dressing is made with equal parts of lime juice and fish sauce, pinch of sugar and chilies as much as you dare. Mix just before serving. It goes well with a plate of hot white rice and crispy Thai omelette.

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