Thai Dessert Recipes

Known as Khanohm faawy (ขนมฝอย) or Khanohm handtraa, this sweet or savory packet can be a dessert or a snack. The dessert has a sweet filling of silky mung beans and a coconut marzipan-like paste, while the snack’s savory filling consists of shrimp and pork minced and seasoned with garlic, coriander root and white peppercorns. Each is theatrically wrapped in a striking nest of skillfully crafted duck’s egg thread.

เมนูนี้จะมีคำอธิบายและวิธีทำเป็นขั้นตอนละเอียดเป็นภาษาไทยและภาษาอังกฤษ

The first reference to sohm choon as a dessert appears in in the early 1800s, in the culinary poetry of King Rama II gaap heh chohm khreuuang khaao waan (กาพย์เห่ชมเครื่องคาว - หวาน). The poetry was sung during the royal barge’s procession, and this verse refers to sohm choon as a dish made of lychees. A closer look at other foods that are mentioned in the verse also reveals other dishes that are clearly of Chinese origin, such as boiled pork spleen (dtohm dtap lek ต้มตับเหล็ก), steamed bird’s nests (rang nohk neung รังนกนึ่ง) and persimmons (luuk phlap ลูกพลับ).

เมนูนี้จะมีคำอธิบายและวิธีทำเป็นขั้นตอนละเอียดเป็นภาษาไทยและภาษาอังกฤษ

Deceptively simple, the recipe for battered, deep-fried unripe rice and grated coconut banana rolls (khao mao thaawt, ข้าวเม่าทอด) is actually quite challenging to master. Like so many Thai dessert recipes, this seemingly straightforward dish has a complex character.

เมนูนี้จะมีคำอธิบายและวิธีทำเป็นขั้นตอนละเอียดเป็นภาษาไทยและภาษาอังกฤษ

This ball-shaped dessert has a sweet coconut filling (gracheek), surrounded by a thin crust of pounded unripe rice crumbs, along with a tempting fragrance enriched with a Thai dessert candle or fresh flowers. Demonstrating brilliant creativity and attention to detail, this classical Thai dessert uses only three basic ingredients. In this article, we have elected to follow the traditional recipe published in 1908 by Thanpuying Plean Passakornrawong.

เมนูนี้จะมีคำอธิบายและวิธีทำเป็นขั้นตอนละเอียดเป็นภาษาไทยและภาษาอังกฤษ

Rice harvesting takes place only once a year, and there are only two weeks where the ripening grains are suitable for producing Khao Mao.
Khao Mao doesn't age well, it gets dry and tough quickly. The-once-vivid beautiful green color that portrayed the essence of its immaturity and the beginning of the rice harvesting season, slowly fades away, along with its bread like scent.

One of the charms of street food is that it finds you rather than you finding it. Therefore you are usually in the perfect mood to embrace it.

This treat along with other sweets are traditionally presented on tricycle drawn trays that are protected from insects and pollution by a transparent nylon tent and light up by a single light bulb.

Thai desserts are usually made from common ingredients and therefore very popular. However, it was only during the 17th century that desserts and sweets actually became part of everyday meals. In the old days, they were served only at auspicious occasions and ceremonies.

During wedding ceremonies, for example, four kinds of sweets are usually served, collectively known as "the four plates dessert" (ขนมสี่ถ้วย ; khanohm see thuay). The ancient Thai expression "To eat four cups of dessert" (กินสี่ถ้วย ; gin see thuay ) used in the central region of the kingdom as an idiom referring to a wedding banquet.

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